DIY ‘bat country’ Mouse Mat

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I did say that I would share what I did with the other cork pot stand – so here we go, a more manly mouse mat made as a birthday present (see my original one here)!  I’d like to mention that I have never read Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, so I’m hoping that this is an alright representation.  This time I experimented by drawing on the cork with Sharpie instead of the acrylic paint I used on my own mat and I actually think it turned out better.  The mouse glides much more easily over it.

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Bedroom Makeover 1: DIY Cork Mousemat

DIY cork mousemat

Lately I’ve been trying to turn my bedroom into a place that I look forward to coming home to, rather than a place that I dump my stuff in while I’m not at work or uni.  I’ve recently received a new desktop (first blog post on this baby!), but the mouse is useless on my desk.  I thought making  a cute mousemat would be a good place to start with my bedroom makeover and luckily found a couple of cork pot stands on sale that were the perfect size (in case you haven’t noticed, I really like the look of cork – see my cork noticeboard and cork coasters)

What you need:

mousemat supplies

  • Cork base
  • A design (my mum kindly created a stencil for me using her fancy-smancy printer)
  • Acrylic paint and paintbrush
  • A piece of felt
  • Glue

Here’s how: 

1.  Paint the design onto the cork (I stuck the stencil on, used a brush to stipple on the paint and peeled the stencil off once the paint was almost dry).

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2.  Paint around the edges (use tape if you want a straight(ish) line – mine still isn’t perfect, but I tried).

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3.  Cut the felt slightly smaller than the cork and glue onto the back.

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4.  Leave to dry properly before using.

Ta-da!  This seems to be working well so far.  I was a bit worried the paint would need fixing with something, but I’ve been using it for a bit and nothing has come off on my mouse.  I’m turning the other cork mat into a present for a special someone, so I’ll probably be posting about that later.

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How-to: DIY Cork Coasters

I’ve already shared my cork stamps, but what I haven’t yet posted is what I actually used them for.  I needed a set of coasters for my room and seeing as I had a sheet of cork to spare I figured that would be the perfect material to make them from.  After a failed attempt at creating stripes on the coaster shapes (if someone could tell me what I’m doing wrong that would be great), I decided to flip them over and decorate them with my stamps instead.  For a project that I was about to abandon, I think they turned out pretty well.  Here’s how you can make your own:

What you need:

  • A sheet of cork board
  • Something circular to draw around (I used an old drinks coaster)
  • A craft knife
  • A sheet of felt
  • Stamps and ink for decoration
  • PVA glue

How to:

1.  Draw around old coaster or something the right size/shape onto the cork board.

2.  Cut around the template with a craft knife (it was pretty difficult to create a perfect circle, but I like mine despite being imperfect).

3.  Get stamping!

4.  Cut a slightly smaller circle out of the felt and attach to the back using the PVA glue.

How-To: DIY Cork Stamps (Take 2)

A couple of weeks ago I shared some stationary I made using a stamp fashioned from a wine cork.  This week, while working on another project I stumbled across an easier way to make to my own stamps out of cork and thought I would share.

What you need:

  • Cork board (I used some scrap cork from another project)
  • PVA glue
  • Craft knife
  • A pen or pencil to draw your design

How to make your own cork stamp:

1.  Draw or trace your design onto the cork.  I went for something simple, a moustache, as my cutting skills are not really top notch.

2.  Cut around the design with the craft knife (be careful not to cut yourself!).

3.  Cut a square or rectangle backing from the cork big enough to act as a base for the stamp, but not too big that you can’t tell where you are placing the design.

4.  Apply the PVA glue to both the backing and the design, allow to dry slightly and then press together.  Leave to dry before attempting to stamp anything.

5.  Start stamping!

And there you go, really simple and very effective.  I found it so much easier than trying to carve anything out of a tiny wine cork.

DIY Heart Stationery

 

I’ve been wanting to try out The Sweet Spot’s DIY cork stamp for a while.  This sunny Sunday afternoon seemed like the perfect opportunity.  Despite being unable to find a proper craft knife, the stamp didn’t turn out too horribly.

I love the texture created by the cork and the imperfect shape of the heart.  I used the cork stamp with purple ink to decorate some plain stationary.  I was really worried that it would just end up as a purple blob, but it turned out better than I expected.  I think the stamp could also be used with acrylic paint to create a bolder design.